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Visual Training Activity

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--- DISCONTINUED. (Verified 09/2013) RETAINED IN DATABASE FOR REFERENCE. ---The Busy Box Maze, model 557, is an eye hand coordination activity designed for use by children with cognitive, neurological, and sensory disabilities. The maze box is tilted up and down to move the ball through the simple curves of the maze. When the ball reaches one of the destinations, the user is rewarded by music, vibration, lights or a buzzer. Mounted on a lazy susan, the box can be rotated 360 degres.

Notes: The manufacturer states that they will modify their products to meet special needs. Please call for more information.

Price: 110.95.

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This product record was updated on September 24, 2013.

This product is available from:

Manufacturer:

Enabling Devices

50 Broadway
Hawthorne, New York 10532
United States
Telephone: 800-832-8697 or 914-747-3070.
Fax: 914-747-3509.
Web: http://www.enablingdevices.com.
Email: sales@enablingdevices.com.


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